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I, too
Icy Simpson, soprano Artina McCain, piano Longhorn Music LHM2012001 (2012)

 

 

 

 

 

Negro Spirituals:
He's Got the Whole World In His Hand
Ilma Ranta, piano
Ondine 715 (1995)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Diamonds: Althea Waites Plays Music by African-American Composers
Troubled Water
Althea Waites, piano
Cambria 1097 (1993)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three Dream Portraits
Fi-Yer! A Century of African American Song
William Brown, tenor
Ann Sears, piano
Troy 329 (1999)

 

Home -> Composers -> Bonds, Margaret Allison

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Margaret Allison Bonds  (1913-1972)

African American Composer, Pianist & Musical Director

March 3, 2013 was Centennial of Birth
 


 


Table of Contents

  1 Birth
  2 Youth
  3 College
  4 Wanamaker Prize
  5 Pianist
  6 Nadia Boulanger
  7 Social Circle
  8 Chicago
  9 New York City
 10 Juilliard
 11 Duo Piano
 12 Honors
 13 Theater
 14 Overview
 15 Troubled Water
 16 Langston Hughes
 17 McNeil Jubilee Singers
 18 Death
 19 Three Songs
 20 Three Dream Portraits
 21 Amen! 
 22 I, too

 23 Works 
 24 Bibliography
 


Margaret Allison Bonds

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill held a "Symposium of Celebration" on the Centennial of Margaret Allison Bonds in 2013

 

Audio Sample:  Musicians Showcase 1091 (2003); Senku: Piano Music by Composers of African Descent;  William H. Chapman Nyaho, piano;
Troubled Water
 

1 Birth
Margaret Allison Richardson Bonds was an African American composer, pianist and musical director who was born in Chicago, Illinois on March 3, 1913. Dr. Dominique-René de Lerma is a former Professor of Music at Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisconsin.  He is a specialist in African heritage in classical music, and has kindly made his research entry on Margaret Bonds available to this Website.  We learn from it that her parents separated two years after her birth, and divorced two years later:            

She was born in Chicago as Margaret Jeanette Allison Majors to Dr. Monroe Majors and Estella C. Bonds...
                   ...
Her parents separated in 1915 and, when her parents divorced in 1917, her mother resumed her birth name, assigning this also to her daughter.

2 Youth
Prof. De Lerma describes Estella Bonds as:              

...a church organist who began teaching her daughter piano when the child was five.

At the age of 13, Margaret Bonds started to learn composition from two up and coming African American composers, and also learned piano from one of them.  She studied at a music school and participated in the youth section of a national organization of African American musicians, according to Prof. De Lerma:

By the time she had begun the study of composition in 1926 with Chicago newcomers William Dawson and Florence Price (with whom she also studied piano), she was a charter member of the Junior Music Division of the National Association of Negro Musicians, and had been a student at the Coleridge-Taylor Music School, where her mother and Tom Theodore Taylor served on the faculty.

3 College
Bonds entered Northwestern University at 16, in 1929.  The research entry names her faculty members for piano and composition:         

In 1929, she enrolled at Northwestern University where her piano teacher was Emily Boettiche Bogue and her composition teachers were Arnie Oldburg and Dean Carl Beecher. A Rosenwald Scholarship was awarded for graduate study at Northwestern in 1933, when she had been awarded the B.M. degree.

4 Wanamaker Prize
Prof. Rae Linda Brown wrote the liner notes for the CD Black Diamonds: Althea Waites Plays Music By African-American Composers, Cambria 1097 (1993).  She describes the importance of the Wanamaker Prize Bonds won in 1932 for her composition Sea Ghost:
                 

Margaret Bonds (1913-1972) achieved national recognition when she won the Wanamaker Prize in 1932 for the song Sea Ghost, the same contest in which her teacher, Florence Price, received her coveted awards.

5 Pianist
The research entry notes the young pianist made her debut at New York's Town Hall in 1932, and performed a concertino at the Chicago World's Fair in 1933.  Bonds played a concerto by Florence Price with the Chicago Women's Orchestra in 1934, in a concert broadcast by CBS Radio:

She gave her debut in Town Hall on 7 February 1932...
                      ...
She was pianist with the Chicago Women’s Orchestra the next year in the D minor concerto of Florence Price, conducted by Ebba Sundstrom and broadcast on CBS. She now had her M.M. degree from Northwestern (1934) and had already performed John Alden Carpenter’s concertino with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in 1933, with Frederick Stock as conductor.

The African American poet Maya Angelou wrote the liner notes for the solo piano CD of William Chapman Nyaho, Senku: Piano Music by Composers of African Descent, Music Masters 1091 (2003).  She says Bonds' 1933 solo with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra was a first for an African American:

It was during her time at Northwestern University that she became the first African American to solo with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in 1933.

6 Nadia Boulanger
Prof. De Lerma tells us Margaret Bonds had hoped to study with William Grant Still and Nadia Boulanger, but was unable to do so:

Bonds had wanted to study with William Grant Still and approached Nadia Boulanger for lessons. Neither hope was realized. Boulanger did not accept her because she felt she would be unable to provide proper guidance.

7 Social Circle
The research entry lists many of the musicians who socialized with Margaret Bonds and her family:

The social circle of the Bonds’ home and later when she was an adult included composers Will Marion Cook, William Dawson, Kermit and Dorothy Rudd Moore, Noble Sissle, and Féla Sowandé, choral conductor Hall Johnson, singers Betty Allen, McHenry Boatright, Lillian Evanti, Roland Hayes, Hortense Love, and Abbie Mitchell, writers Arna Bontemps, Langston Hughes, and Countee Cullen, pianist Armenta Adams, educator Nematilda Ritchie Woodard

8 Chicago
Maya Angelou continues her description of the activities of Bonds after finishing her studies at Northwestern University:

Upon graduation, Margaret Bonds worked in Chicago performing, composing and collaborating with writer and poet, Langston Hughes in cantatas, musicals and song cycles.

The research entry of Prof. De Lerma elaborates further on this stage of Bonds' career:

She met Langston Hughes in 1936 and toured Wisconsin and Iowa with singer Katherine Van Buren, while studying orchestration with Albert Nölte. Both this season and the next, she worked in the Detroit theater of Elsie Roxborough and joined Katherine Dunham in the production of William Grant Still’s La guiablesse. For the musical education of Black youth in Chicago, she founded the Allied Arts Academy.

9 New York City
Bonds relocated to New York City in 1939, the same year she and William Richardson were married.  She took employment as an editor, Prof. De Lerma writes:        

She moved to New York City in 1939 and served as editor for the publisher, Clarence Williams.  It was this year that she married William Richardson. Her repeat performance of Carpenter’s concertino was broadcast with the WNYC orchestra in 1941.

10 Juilliard
When Bonds moved to New York City she intended to study at Juilliard.  The research entry explains that she received a scholarship from Roy Harris, and enrolled in 1941.  It identifies these individuals as her professors:

...Roy Harris (who provided her with a scholarship), Robert Starer, Martha Anderson, Emily Boetticher Bogue, and Walter Gossett.

11 Duo Piano
Bonds was active as a composer, soloist and member of a duo piano team in the 1940s.  Prof. De Lerma writes

...in 1942, Hortense Love performed Bonds’ 5 Creek-freedmen.  She had meanwhile been partner in a duo piano team with Frances Kraft Reckling, Calvin Jackson, and Gerald Cook (touring and
broadcasting on WNYC with Cook in 1944) and as soloist appeared with The Chicago Women’s Symphony Orchestra, the Scranton Symphony, the New York City Symphony Orchestra, with recitals in Canada, Orchestra Hall (Chicago), radio broadcasts in New York and Hollywood, and performances in night clubs.

12 Honors
We learn from Prof. De Lerma that Margaret Bonds was honored in the 1960s by concerts devoted entirely to her compositions, an award from Northwestern University and the proclamation of a Margaret Bonds Day by the Mayor of Chicago:      

Concerts dedicated totally to her music were offered in Detroit in 1963 and in Washington in 1967.  That year she received the Alumni Merit Award from Northwestern University and Mayor Richard Daley declared 31 January to be Margaret Bonds Day.

Prof. De Lerma adds that Bonds was also honored by the National Council of Negro Women (1962) and by ASCAP (1964-1966).

13 Theatre
Prof. De Lerma says Margaret Bonds taught theater in both Harlem and Los Angeles:

Prior to her move in 1967 to Los Angeles, she taught at Harlem’s American Theatre Wing and wrote for the Los Angeles Jubilee Singers. The year after her arrival in California, she taught at the Inner City Institute and Repertory Theater, remaining until her death.

14 Overview
Maya Angelou continues her liner notes with an overview of the varied musical output of Margaret Bonds:

As a highly successful composer, Bonds wrote for a variety of genres including orchestral and choral music, chamber music, art songs and popular songs. Her arrangements of Negro spirituals were sung by legendary sopranos such as Leontyne Price. It is interesting to note, however, that there is little of her piano music in print due to the fact that as an accomplished concert pianist and improviser, most of her piano music was committed to memory and not written down. Bonds received numerous awards during her lifetime for her contributions to the music of African Americans.

15 Troubled Water
Maya Angelou describes  Troubled Water  (4:52) as one of Margaret Bonds' "masterpieces":

This beautifully crafted work states the refrain and verse of the spiritual in various guises. The broad sweeping melody is initially spiced up by complex rhythmic accompaniments and harmonized with elements of the blues and jazz. It is then restated in a more languid tempo, beautifully embellished in the gospel tradition of piano performance. This work becomes increasingly more driven, building up to a grand climax with the juxtaposition of the two parts of the refrain Wade in the Water and God's gonna trouble the water.

Another interpretation of Troubled Water (5:06) has been recorded by Jamaican-born pianist Maria Corley on Soulscapes: Piano Music by African American Women, Albany Troy 857 (2006).

16 Langston Hughes
Troubled Water is also on the program of the CD Kaleidoscope: Music by African-American Women, Leonarda 339 (1995).  The performers are pianist Helen Walker-Hill and violinist Gregory Walker.  In the liner notes, Walker-Hill  says of Margaret Bonds:

She collaborated frequently with poet Langston Hughes in some of her best-known works, including the musical Shakespeare in Harlem and the cantata Ballad of the Brown King.

17 McNeil Jubilee Singers
Dr. Albert J. McNeil is Founder of The Albert McNeil Jubilee Singers of Los Angeles, an ensemble with a lavish website at which choral music can be sampled and photos of the group over the years can be seen, http://www.amjsla.org/ Dr. McNeil wrote this post in the Guest Book at AfriClassical.com on June 4, 2011:

I had the pleasure of doing Margaret Bond's "Ballad of the Brown King" while it was still in manuscript here in Los Angeles at the Holman United Methodist Church but under the aegis of The Church of Christian Fellowship (United Church of Christ) on the same program with J.S. Bach's “Magnificat". Margaret had tremendous influence on my career especially to go to the University of California, Davis and head its choral and Music Education program in 1970. I loved her for so many wonderful insights she gave me -- God Rest Her Memory.

18 Death
Margaret Allison Bonds died in Los Angeles, California on April 26, 1972.  Prof. Rae Linda Brown says in her liner notes:  

Her last major work, Credo, was performed by the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra one month after her death.

19 Three Songs
Three other songs by Margaret Bonds appear on the CD  Ah! Love But A Day: Songs and Spirituals of American Women, Troy 385 (2000).  They are: Songs of the Season, The Pasture and Little David play on your harp.  The performers are Louise Toppin, soprano, Jay Pierson, baritone, and John O'Brien, piano.

20 Three Dream Portraits
Odekhiren Amaize, a U.S. citizen who was born in Nigeria, is a bass-baritone.  He is accompanied by the pianist David Korevaar in a rendition of Bonds' Three Dream Portraits on a CD entitled: The Negro Speaks of Rivers, MSR Classics 1011 (2000).

21 Amen!
Margaret Bonds also wrote He's Got the Whole World In His Hand, which has been recorded by Oral Moses, bass-baritone and George Bailey, piano.  The CD is Amen! African-American Composers of the 20th Century, Troy 459 (2001). 

22 I, too
I, too was recorded by Icy Simpson, soprano and Artina McCain, piano on Longhorn Music LHM2012001.  It includes our works of Margaret Bonds. They are Three Dream Portraits with lyrics by Langston Hughes: Minstrel Man (1:59), Dream Variations (2:01) and I, Too (1:44), as well as  Wade in the Water (3:14) which was arranged by Mark Hayes.

23 Works
Prof. Dominique-René de Lerma
CD: Oral Moses, bass-baritone; George Morrison Bailey, piano. Albany TROY  (2001; Amen!; African-American composers of the 20th century).

CD: Sebronette Barnes, soprano; Elise Auerbach, piano. Senrad Records  (2000; You can tell the world; Songs by African-American women).

CD: William Brown, tenor; Ann Sears, piano. Albany TROY (1999; Fi-yer!; A century of African-American song).

A dance in brown, for piano (1931). Award: Honorable Mention, Rodman Wanamaker Music Competition, 1931.

A Spanish mother, for piano (1930s). Première: Chicago, Allied Arts Academy; Margaret Bonds, piano; 1939/IV/23.

African dance, for soprano, baritone & piano (1953). Première: Adele Addison, soprano; Lawrence Winters, baritone.

April rain song, for voice & piano. Based on a melody of Toy Harper. Text: Langston Hughes.

Available Jones, for voice & piano. Text: Ted Persons and Russ Smith.

Ballad of the brown king, for tenor, SATB & piano (1960). New York: Sam Fox, 1961. 56p. 1. Of the three wise men; 2. They brought fine gifts; 3. Sing alleluia; 4. Mary had a little baby; 5. Now when Jesus was born; 6. Could he have been an Ethiope?; 7. Oh, sing of the king who was tall and brown; 8. That was Christmas long ago; 9. Alleluia. Text: Langston Hughes.

----- for soloists, SATB & orchestra. Bryn Mawr: Theodore Presser. Première: New York, Clark Street YMCA; Master Choir; New York City College Orchestra; Margaret Bonds, conductor; 1960/XII/11 (telecast on NBC Television).

----- 4. Mary had a little baby, for women’s voices. New York: Sam Fox, 1963.

Be a little savage with me, for voice & piano (1949). Text: Langston Hughes.

Beyond the end of the trail, for voice & piano. Text: Roger Chaney.

Birth, for voice & piano. Text: Langston Hughes.

Bound, for voice & piano (1939). Dedication: “To my Larry.”

Bright star, for voice & piano. Sherman Oaks: Solo Music, 1968. Text: Janice Lovoos.

Burlesque is alive, for musical theater. Première: Los Angeles; Inner City Repertory Company.

Children’s sleep, for SATB & piano (1940). New York: Carl Fischer, 1942, 1972 (CM 4715). 5p.. Text: Winter’s night dream, by Vernon Glasser.

Clandestine in the morning line, incidental music for piano to the play by Josh Greenfield. Première: New York; 1961/X.

Composition for the dance, for piano. Première: Chicago, Allied Arts Academy; Margaret Bonds, piano; 1939/IV/23.

Cowboy from South Parkway, for voice & piano. Text: Langston Hughes.

Credo, for soloists, SATB & piano (1965). 1. I believe in God; 2. I believe in the Negro race; 3. I believe in pride of race; 4. I believe in the devil and his angels; Darkwater: 5. I believe in the prince of peace; 6. I believe in liberty; 7. I believe in patience. Text: W. E. B. DuBois. Première: Washington; 1967/III/12.

----- for soloists, SATB & orchestra . Dedication: In memory of Abbie Mitchell and Langston Hughes. Première (of four items): 1972/V/21; Los Angeles; Los Angele Philharmonic; Zubin Mehta, conductor;.

5 Creek-freedmen spirituals, for voice & piano (1942). New York: Mutual Music Society, 1946 (5 spirituals). 1. Dry bones; 2. Sit down servant; 3. Lord, I just can’t keep from cryin’; 4. You can tell the world; 5. I’ll reach to heaven. Commission: Hortense Love. Première: New York, Town Hall; Hortense Love, soprano; 1942.

----- Bryn Mawr: Hildegard Publishing Co., 1995, ed. by Vivian Taylor (5 Creek-freedom spirituals).

----- 1. Dry bones. Bryn Mawr: Hildegard Publishing Co., 1995, edited by Vivian Taylor (Art songs and spirituals by African-American women composers, 09528), p43-47.

CD: Ruth Hamilton, contralto; Vivian Taylor, piano. Koch International Classics 3-7247-2HI (1994, Watch and pray).

CD: William Warfield, bass-baritone; John Arpin, piano. Pro Arte CDD 3443 (1993, Spirituals).

----- 2. Sit down servant.

----- for soprano, chorus & orchestra, arr. by Mark Fax.

CD: Leontyne Price, soprano; orchestra & chorus; Leonard DePaur, conductor. BMG Classics 09026-68157-2 (1996; The essential Leontyne Price).

LP: Leontyne Price, soprano; orchestra & chorus; Leonard DePaur, conductor. RCA LM-2600 (1962).

----- 3. Lord, I just can’t keep from cryin’. Bryn Mawr: Hildegard Publishing Co., 1995, edited by Vivian Taylor (Art songs and spirituals by African-American women composers, 09528), p51-57.

CD: Ruth Hamilton, contralto; Vivian Taylor, piano. Koch International Classics 3-7247-2HI (1994, Watch and pray).

----- 4. You can tell the world, for high voice & piano. New York: Mutual Music Society, 1957, 1946 (5 spirituals). 7p. Duration: 1:33.

LP: Veronica Tyler, soprano; Ernest Ragogini, piano. BRC Productions (1980).

LP: Wilhelmenia Fernandez, soprano; George Darden, piano. Tioch Digital TD-1009 (1982).

----- for soprano, chorus & orchestra, arr. by Mark Fax..

Cue 10; down and out, for voice & piano (1960). Text: Langston Hughes.

Diary of a divorcee, for voice & piano (c1968). Text: Janice Lovoos.

Didn't it rain?, for high voice & piano. New York: Beeckman Music, Mercury Music, 1967. 5p. Duration: 5:00.

CD: Anthony Brown, baritone. The spiritual project (Toil and triumph).

CD: Stephen Salter, baritone; Sheila Kibbe, piano. Musica Numeris CYP 9602 (1996).

CD: William Warfield, bass-baritone; John Arpin, piano. Pro Arte CDD 3443 (1993, Spirituals).

Don’t speak, for voice & piano (c1968). Text: Janice Lovoos.

LP : Peggy Lee, vocalist.

Don’t you want to be free?, musical (1938). Text: Langston Hughes. Première: Chicago; Negro Theater Project of the WPA.

Down South in Dixie, for voice & piano (ca. 1933).

3 Dream portraits, for high voice & piano (1932). New York: G. Ricordi, 1959, 1932. 1. Minstrel man [dedication: Lawrence Winters]; 2. Dream variation [dedication: Adele Addison]; 3. I, too, sing America [dedication: Lawrence Winters]. 11p. Text: The dream keeper, by Langston Hughes. Première: Columbus OH; National Association of Negro Musicians; Lawrence Watson, tenor; 1959/V. Duration: 6:02.

----- New York: Edward B. Marks Music, 1977, ed. by Willis Patterson (Art songs by Black American composers). (#N.Y. 2035).

----- Bryn Mawr: Hildegard Publishing Co., 1995, edited by Vivian Taylor (Art songs and spirituals by African-American women composers, 09528), p58-67.

AT: William Brown, tenor, Reynaldo Reyes, piano.

CD: Brandon Richardson, baritone; Wallace Cheatham, piano (2003/VIII/1, Churchill College, University of Cambridge).

CD: Dawn Padmore, soprano; Darryl Hollister, piano (Churchill College, University of Cambridge, 2003/VIII/4).

CD: Jo Ann Pickens, soprano; Donald Sulzen, piano. Koch International Classics 1147 (1994, My heritage).

CD: JoAnne Stephenson, soprano; Lora Young-Wright, piano (2003/VIII/04; Churchill College, University of Cambridge).

CD: Neva Pilgrim, soprano; Steven Heyman, piano. Leonarda LE 338 (1994; Women’s voices; five centuries of song).

CD: Odikhiren Amaize, bass-baritone; David Korevaar, piano. Musicians’ Showcase MS 1011 (2000; The Negro speaks of rivers; art songs by African-American composers).

CD: Pamela Dillard, mezzo-soprano; Vivian Taylor, piano. Koch International Classics 3-7247-2HI (1994, Watch and pray).

CD: Sebronette Barnes, soprano; Elise Auerbach, piano. Senrab Records (2001; You can tell the world; songs by African-American women).

LP: Claritha Buggs, soprano, with piano. University of Michigan SM-0015 (1980; Art songs by Black American composers).

---- 1. Minstrel man.

AC: G. Carlton Hines, tenor; André Thomas, piano (1981/II/22, Urbana, University of Illinois).

AC: Robert Honeysucker, bass-baritone; Vivian Taylor, piano (1981/VI/29).

AT: Ben Holt, baritone; Cliff Jackson, piano. (1984, Baltimore, Peabody-Morgan Symposium).

AT: Ben Holt, baritone; Vasta Shambon, piano.

CD: Darryl Taylor, tenor; Maria Corley, piano; William Warfield, narrator. Naxos 8.559136 (2002; Dreamer; A portrait of Langston Hughes). Liner notes: “Langston Hughes and music” by Arnold Rampersand (German translation: Tilo Kittel; French translation: Pierre-Martin Juban); Dominique-René de Lerma. 8p.

CD: Lucille Fields, soprano; Harriet Wingreen, piano. Cambria CD-1037 (1990).

CD: Marcoulescu, soprano; Phillabaum, piano. Gasparo 287.

CD: Richard Heard, tenor; Pamela Howland, piano. HM Classics (1998; Ain’t a that good news?).

----- 2. Dream variation.

AC: George Shirley, tenor; Wayne Saanders, piano. (1976/VI/23, Westminster Choir School).

---- 3. I too sing America.

AC: G. Carlton Hines, tenor; André Thomas, piano (1981/II/22, Urbana, University of Illinois).

LP: Claritha Buggs, soprano, with unidentified pianist. University of Michigan SM-0015 (1980; Art songs by Black American composers).

----- for men’s chorus (1967). Première [?]: New York, Town Hall; Wyatt Logan Choir; 1967.V.

Dry bones, for voice & piano. New York: Mutual Music Society, 1946.

----- Bryn Mawr: Hildegard Publishing Co., 1995, edited by Vivian Taylor (Art songs and spirituals by African-American women composers, 09528) p43-47

CD: Sebronette Barnes, soprano; Mark Ray, piano (2003/VIII/1, Churchill College, University of Cambridge).

12 Easy lessons and exercises, for piano (1938). Chicago: Bowles Music House, 1939.

Empty interlude, for voice & piano. New York: Robbins, 1941. Text: Roger Chaney and Andy Razaf.

Every time I feel the spirit, for voice & piano (1970).

Ezek’el saw the wheel, for medium voice & piano. New York: Mercury, 1959. Dedicaton: Betty Allen.

AT: Edward Pierson, baritone; Donald Walker, piano.

----- for medium voice & orchestra. Bryn Mawr: Theodore Presser. Dedication: Betty Allen.

----- for SATB. New York: Mercury, 1966.

----- for SATB & piano. Bryn Mawr: Theodore Presser, 1959 (312-40860). 7p.

Fantasy in purple, for voice & piano (1937).

Feast, for voice & piano (1965).

Fields of wonder, for men’s voices (1963). 1. Heaven; 2. Snake; 3. Snail; 4. Big Sur; 5. Moonlight night; 6. Carmel; 7. New moon. Text: Langston Hughes. Première: New York, Brooklyn Museum; Lincoln University Men’s Glee Club; 1964/II.

Footprints on my heart, for voice & piano. Text: Marjorie May.

Freedom land, for voice & piano (1964). Text: Langston Hughes.

----- for SATB (1964).

Georgia, for voice & piano. New York: Georgia Music, 1939. Text: Andy Razaf, Margaret Bonds, and Joe Davis.

----- for voice & orchestra.

Go tell it on the mountain, for voice & piano.

----- for SATB. Bryn Mawr: Mercury, 1962 (MC 432). 6p.

He's got the whole world in his hands, for high voice & piano (1963). Bryn Mawr: Beeckman Music, Mercury Music, 1965, 1963. 5p. (#A360-3) Commision: Leontyne Price. Duration: 2:00.

----- Bryn Mawr: Hildegard Publishing Co., 1995, edited by Vivian Taylor (Art songs and spirituals by African-American women composers, 09528) p68-70.

AC: Paul Spencer Adkins, tenor, with unidentified piano.

CD: Anthony Brown, baritone. The spiritual project (Toil and triumph).

CD: Randye Jones, soprano; Francis Conlon, piano. Ahhjay Records Ahhj-0001 (Come down angels).

CD: Kathleen Battle, soprano; James Levine, piano (1984/VIII/25). Deutsche Grammophon 415 361-2 (1986, Salzburg recital).

CD: Leontyne Price, soprano; David Garvey, piano ((Carnegie Hall; 1965/II/28). RCA Victor 09026-63908-2 (2002). Liner notes: Daniel Guss (22p).

CD: Osceola Davis, soprano; Ilmo Ranta, piano. Ondine ODE 715-2 (1988, Negro spirituals). Liner notes: Pekka Hako, in English and Finnish. (7p.)

CD: Pamela Dillard, mezzo-soprano; Vivian Taylor, piano. Koch International Classics 3-7247-2HI (1994, Watch and pray).

LP: Daisy Jackson, soprano; Buckner Gamby, piano. Phase II Recording Services KM-1702 (1977; The Lois J. Wright Memorial Concert Series, vol. 1).

LP: Kathleen Battle, soprano; unidentified pianist (1980/03/03). Legendary Recordings LP 139 (1980).

LP: Paul Spencer Adkins, tenor, with piano. Marble Arch LS-1181 1981?).

LP: Veronica Tyler, soprano; Ernest Ragogini, piano. BRC Productions (1980; The passion of Christ in spirituals).

LP: Wilhelmenia Fernandez, soprano; George Darden piano. Tioch Digital Records TD 1009 (1982; spirituals).

----- for piano (c1970). For Gary Osby.

---- for soprano & orchestra.

AT: Leontyne Price, soprano; Israel Philharmonic; Zubin Mehta, conductor (1978/V, Jerusalem).

----- for soprano, chorus & orchestra. Bryn Mawr: Theodore Presser.

CD: Leontyne Price, soprano; orchestra & chorus; Leonard DePaur, conductor. BMG Classics 09026-68157-2 (1996; The essential Leontyne Price).

LP: Leontyne Price, soprano; orchestra & chorus; Leonard DePaur, conductor. RCA LM-2600 (1962).

----- for TTBB (c1966), Dedication: In memory of the composer’s mother, Estella C. Bonds.

Hold on, for high voice & piano. New York: Mercury Music, 1962. 5p. Duration: 3:00.

CD: William Warfield, bass-baritone; John Arpin, piano. Pro Arte CDD 3443 (1993, Spirituals).

----- for SATB & piano. New York: Handy Brothers, 1962. 11p.

----- for SSA.

----- for voice & orchestra.

----- for voice, SATB & orchestra. Bryb Mawr: Theodore Presser, 1968.

Hold the wind, for voice & piano (1970).

Hyacinth, for voice & piano. Text: Edna St. Vincent Millay.

I got a home in that rock, for voice & piano (1959). New York: Beekman, 1962, 1968. Dedication: Betty Allen.

----- for voice & orchestra. Bryn Mawr: Theodore Presser. Commision: Betty Allen.

I shall pass through the world, for voice & piano. New York: Bourne, 1966.

----- for SATB. New York: Bourne, 1967 (829). 7p.

----- for SATB (1966). New York: Bourne, 1967. Text: Étienne Grellet. Dedication: In memory of Aunt Victoria.

I want Jesus to walk with me, for violoncello & piano (1964). Première: 1964/IX/10; Maryland; Kermit Moore, cello.

I want to be ready, for voice & piano.

I wish I knew how it would feel to be free, for soprano & SATB, by Billy Taylor, arr. by Margaret Bonds for Leontyne Price.

CD: Leontyne Price, soprano; Rust College Choir; Lassaye van Buren Holmes, conductor. BMG Classics 09026-68157-2 (1996; The essential Leontyne Price).

LP: Leontyne Price, soprano; Rust College Choir; Lassaye van Buren Holmes, conductor. RCA LSC-3183 (1971).

I’ll make you savvy, for voice & piano. Text: Langston Hughes.

I’m going to Reno, for voice & piano.

I’m gonna do a song and dance, for unison chorus. Text: Bill Cairo.

I’m so in love, for voice unaccompanied (c1927). Text: Margaret Bonds and Leonard Reed.

If you’re not there, for SATB (1939). Text: Andy Razaf.

Joshua fit de battle of Jericho, for medium voice & piano. New York: Beekman, 1967.

2. ----- for voice & orchestra. Bryn Mawr: Theodore Presser, 1967.

Joy, for voice & piano (1936). Text: Langston Hughes.

----- for SAT, string quartet & piano (1966).

----- for SATB, string quartet & piano (1954). Première [?]: George McClain Chorale; George McClain, conductor.

----- for soprano, baritone & piano (1966). Première: Adele Addison, soprano; Lawrence Winters, baritone.

Lady by the moon I vow, for voice & piano (c1939). Text: Robert Dunsmore.

Let’s make a dream come true, for voice & piano. Text: Roger Chaney.

Let’s meet tonight in a dream, for voice & piano. Text: Roger Chaney.

Little Davd, play on your harp, for voice & piano. Première: New York, Town Hall; Lawrence Watson, tenor; 1956/III/25.

CD: Louise Toppin, soprano; John O’Brien, piano. Albany TROY 385 (1999, Ah! Love, but a day).

Lord, I just can’t keep from cryin’, for voice & piano. New York: Mutual Music Society, 1946.

----- Bryn Mawr: Hildegard Publishing Co., 1995, edited by Vivian Taylor (Art songs and spirituals by African-American women composers, 09528) p48-50.

CD: Leontyne Price, soprano; David Garvey, piano ((Carnegie Hall; 1965/II/28). RCA Victor 09026-63908-2 (2002).Liner notes: Daniel Guss (22p).

Love ain’t what it used to be, for voice & piano (c1935).

Love’s runnin’ riot, for voice & piano (1936). Text: Langston Hughes.

Marquette Road blues, for piano (c1918).

Mary had a little baby, for piano. New York: Fox, 1962.

Mass, D minor, for SATB & orchestra (1959).

----- 1. Kyrie elieson, for SATB & organ.

Montgomery variations, for orchestra (1965). 1. Prayer meeting; 2. March; 3. One Sunday in the South; 4. Dawn in Dixie. Based on I want Jesus to walk with me. Dedication: Martin Luther King, Jr.

Midtown affair, musical (1958). 1. You give me a lift; 2. Mist over Manhattan; 3. I love the lie I’m living; 4. My kind of man. Text: Roger Chaney.

Migration, ballet.

My kind of man, for voice & piano (1953). Text: Roger Chaney.

My soul's been anchored in the Lord.

CD: Leontyne Price, soprano; David Garvey, piano (1985/01/08). Pro Arte CDD-231.

Night time, for voice & piano (c1937). Text: Langston Hughes.

Nile fantasy, for piano & orchestra, by Philippa Duke Schuyler, arr. by Margaret Bonds. Première: 1967/IX/24;.New York, Town Hall.

No good man, for voice & piano (1937). Text: Langston Hughes.

No man has seen his face, for SATB (1970).

Note on the commercial theater, for voice & piano (1960). Text: Langston Hughes. Dedication: Betty Allen.

Park bench, for voice & piano (1936). Text: Langston Hughes.

Peachtree Street, for voice & piano. New York: Georgia Music, 1939. Text: Andy Razaf, Margaret Bonds, and Joe Davis.

78rpm : Glenn Miller

78rpm : Charley Spivak.

78rpm : Woody Herman.

Film: Gone with the wind.

Peter, go ring dem bells, for voice & piano.

----- for men’s chorus & string quartet (1952). Première: 1956/IX/9; New York, Town Hall; Uptown Men’s Chorale.

----- for SATB & orchestra (1952). Première [?]:1952/IX/30; Fisk Jubilee Singers; Luxembourg Symphony Orchestra.

Peter and the bells, for orchestra.

Playing with fire, for voice & piano. Text: Langston Hughes.

Pot pourri, for voice & piano (c1968). 1. Will there be enough; 2. Go back to Leanna; 3. Touch the hem of his garment; 4. Bright star; 5. No man has seen his face; 6. Animal rock ‘n’ roll. Text: Janice Lovoos and Edmund Penney.

Praise the Lord, for SATB (1965). Première: Yonkers, Sixth Annual Arts Festival; Cain Choristers; Alred E. Cain, conductor; 1965/V/29.

Quintet, piano & strings, F major (1933). In one movement.

Radio ballroom, for voice & piano (c1957). Text: Andy Razaf.

Rainbow gold, for voice & piano. New York: Chappell, 1956. Text: Roger Chaney.

Romey and Julie, incidental music for the play by Robert Dunsmore. Première: Chicago; Negro Theater Project of the WPA.

Run, sinner, run, for voice & piano (1970).

Sea ghost, for voice & piano (1932). Award: Wanamaker Prize, 1932.

Scripture reading, for chamber orchestra (1971). Based on spirituals related to Ezekiel, Davis, Peter, and Joshua. Commission: Nicklauss Wyss. Première: 1971/X/29; San Francisco Little Symphony of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra; Nicklauss Wyss, conductor;.

Shakespeare in Harlem, incidental music for the play by Langston Hughes (1958). Première: Westport CT, White Barn Theater; Robert Glenn, producer & director; or New York, 41st Street Theater; 1960/II.

Silent love; that sweet silent love, for voice & piano (1937). Text: Langston Hughes.

Simon bore the cross, for SATB & organ or piano. 1. Jesus in the garden; 2. He is a good man; 3. The trial; 4. Who is that man?; 5. Don’t you know, Mary?; 6. Simon and Jesus; 7. Crucifixion; 8. The resurrection.

Sing aho, for medium voice & piano. New York: Chappell, 1960. 6p. (#5351-5) Dedication: Betty Allen. Duration: 3:00.

AC: Darryl Taylor, tenor; Deon Nielsen Price, piano. Cambria CT 1035.

----- for voice & orchestra (1962). Première [?]: Charlotte Holloman; Dayton Symphony Orchestra.

Sinner, please don't let this harvest pass, for medium voice & piano (1970). Duration: 3:31.

----- for soprano & SATB (1970).

CD: Leontyne Price, soprano; Rust College Choir; Lassaye van Buren Holmes, conductor. BMG Classics 09026-68157-2 (1996; The essential Leontyne Price).

LP: Leontyne Price, soprano; Rust College Choir; Lassaye van Buren Holmes, conductor. RCA LSC-3183 (1971).

Sit down, servant, for SATB & orchestra. [New York?]: Rogers and Hammerstein. 12p.

----- for soprano, SATB & orchestra.

LP: Leontyne Price, soprano; chorus & orchestra; Leonard DePaur, conductor. RCA LSC-2600 (1962).

Sleep song, for voice & piano (1932). Text: Joyce Kilmer.

Songs of the seasons, for high voice & piano (1955) 1. Poème d’automne (1936); 2. Winter moon (1936); 3. Young love in spring (1955); 4. Summer storm (1955). Text: Langston Hughes. Commission: Lawrence Watson. Première: 1956/III/25; New York, Town Hall; Lawrence Watson, tenor.

CD: Louise Toppin, soprano; John O’Brien, piano. Albany TROY 385 (1999, Ah! Love, but a day).

Spiritual suite, for piano (1950s). 1. The valley of the bones; 2. The bells; 3. Troubled water.

Spirituals five, for high voice & orchestra (1942). New York: Mutual Music, 1946. 1. Dry bones; 2. Sit down, servant; 3. Lord, I just can’t keep from cryin’; 4. You can tell the world; 5. I’ll reach to heaven. Commission: Hortense Love. Première: New York; Town Hall; Hortense Love, soprano.

Spring delight, for voice unaccompanied.

Spring will be so sad, for voice & piano (1940). New York: Mutual Music Society, 1941. Text: Margaret Bonds, and Harold Dickinson.

78rpm: Glenn Miller and His Orchestra. Bluebird B-11095-B (1941).

St. Francis’ prayer, for SATB.

Standing in the need of prayer, for soprano & SATB (1970). Duration: 1:50.

CD: Leontyne Price, soprano; Rust College Choir; Lassaye van Buren Holmes, conductor. BMG Classics 09026-68157-2 (1996; The essential Leontyne Price).

LP: Leontyne Price, soprano; Rust College Choir; Lassaye van Buren Holmes, conductor. RCA LSC-3183 (1971).

Stopping by the woods on a snowy evening, for voice & piano (1960). Text: Robert Frost.

Supplication, for SSAATTBB & piano (1950s). Text: Roger Chaney. Dedication: Harry Revel and George Marion, Jr.

Swing low, sweet chariot, for voice & piano (1952). Première: New York; 1952/V/22.

----- for voice(s) & orchestra.

CD: Kathleen Battle, Jessye Norman, sopranos; chorus & orchestra; James Levine, conductor.

VC: Kathleen Battle, Jessye Norman, sopranos; chorus & orchestra; James Levine, conductor.

T’ain’t no need, for voice & piano (1942). Text: Roger Chaney.

The blues I’m playing, for voice & piano (1941). Text: Langston Hughes.

The little sugar I had last night, for voice & piano (1961). Written for Nina Simone. Variant title: That little sugar I had twice a week.

The migration, musical for instrumental ensemble & piano (1964). Employs Troubled water. Written for Talley Beatty. Première: New York, YM-YWHA; 1964/III/7.

That sweet silent love, for voice unaccompanied. Text: Langston Hughes.

The moon winked twice, for voice & piano (c1941). Text: Margaret Bonds, Dan Burkley, and Dorothy Sachs.

The Negro speaks of rivers; I’ve known rivers, for medium voice & piano (1935). New York: Handy Brothers, 1942, 1935. 7p. Text: Langston Hughes. Dedication: Marian Anderson. Duration: 2:00.

----- Bryn Mawr: Hildegard Publishing Co., 1995, edited by Vivian Taylor (Art songs and spirituals by African-American women composers, 09528) p51-57.

CD: Darryl Taylor, tenor; Maria Corley, piano; William Warfield, narrator. Naxos 8.559136 (2002; Dreamer; A portrait of Langston Hughes). Liner notes: “Langston Hughes and music” by Arnold Rampersand (German translation: Tilo Kittel; French translation: Pierre-Martin Juban); Dominique-René de Lerma. 8p.

CD: Robert Honeysucker, baritone; Vivian Taylor, piano. Koch International Classics 3-7247-2HI (1994, Watch and pray).

CD: Sebronette Barnes, soprano; Mark Ray, piano (2003/VIII/1, Churchill College, University of Cambridge).

----- for medium voice & orchestra. Arranged for Betty Allen.

-----for SATB & piano. New York: Handy Brothers, 1942. 12p. Dedication: Albert J. McNeil and the Sanctuary Choir. Première: New York, Town Hall; Belmont Balladiers; Fritz Weller, conductor; 1941/V/25. Library: Yale (manuscript).

----- for SATB & piano. New York: Handy Brothers, 1942. 12p.

The New York blues, for voice & piano (c1938). Text: Malone Dickerson.

The night shall be filled with music, for SATB (1965). Text: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Première: Yonkers, Sixth Annual Arts Festival; Cain Choristers; Alred E. Cain, conductor; 1965/V/29.

The pasture, for voice & piano (1958). Text: Robert Frost. Première: Stanford University; Marjorie McClung, soprano; 1959/IX.

CD: Louise Toppin, soprano; John O’Brien, piano. Albany TROY 385 (1999, Ah! Love, but a day).

The price of a love affair, for voice & piano. Text: Ernest Richman.

The singin’ mouse, for voice unaccompanied (c1937). Text: Henry Douté.

The way we dance in Chicago, for voice & piano. Text: Langston Hughes. Alternative title: The way we dance in Harlem.

This little light of mine, for voice & piano (1970).

AT: Leontyne Price, soprano; David Garvey, piano. (1978/X/8, Washington, White House).

VHS: Leontyne Price, soprano; David Garvey, piano. (1978/X/8, Washington, White House).

----- for voice, SATB & orchestra. Written for Leontyne Price.

CD: Leontyne Price, soprano; Rust College Choir; Lassaye van Buren Holmes, conductor. BMG Classics 09026-68157-2 (1996; The essential Leontyne Price).

LP: Leontyne Price, soprano; Rust College Choir; Lassaye van Buren Holmes, conductor. RCA LSC-3183 (1971).

Three sheep in a pasture, for piano (c1940).

----- for voice & piano (1940). New York: Clarence Williams.

To a brown girl, dead, for voice & piano (1933; rev. 1956). Boston: R. D. Row, 1956. Text: Countee Cullen. Commission: Etta Moten. Première: John Miles, tenor.

Trampin’, for voice & piano. New York: Galaxy, 1931.

Tropics after dark, musical (1940). 1. Chocolate Carmencita; 2. Lonely little maiden by the sea; 3. Market day in Martinique; 4. Pretty little flower of the tropics; 5. Sweet nothings in Spanish; 6. When the sun goes down in rhumba land. Première [cancelled]: Chicago, American Negro Exposition.

Troubled water, for piano (1950s). New York: Sam Fox Publishing Co., 1967. 7p. Duration: 5:30. Dedication: Toy Harper. See also Spiritual suite.

----- Bryn Mawr: Hildegard Publishing Co., 1992 (Black women composers, ed. by Helen Walker-Hill) p54-60.

AC: Eileen Cline, piano (1976/IV/11, Slippery Rock State College).

CD: Althea Waites, piano (1990). Cambria CD-1097 (1993, Black diamonds). Liner notes: Rae Linda Brown.

CD: Debra Torok, piano. Verra Classics (1995; Through and within this century past).

CD: Helen Walker-Hill, piano. Leonarda LE 339 (1995, Kaleidoscope; music by African-American women).

CD: William Chapman Nyaho, piano. Musicians Showcase MS-1091 (2003, Senku; Piano music by composers of African descent). Liner notes: Maya Amgelou, William Chapman Nyaho.

LP: Ruth Norman, piano. Opus One 39 (ca. 1978).

----- for SATB (1952).

----- for orchestra (1966).

----- for violoncello & piano (1964). Arranged for Kermit Moore.

U. S. A., incidental music for the play by John Dos Passos. Première: ANTA Theater.

Voo doo man, for voice unaccompanied. Text: Langston Hughes.

Waltz from the notebook of a ballet accompanist, for piano (1930s). Première: Chicago, Allied Arts Academy; Margaret Bonds, piano; 1939/IV/23.

West Coast blues, for voice & piano (c1938).

What lips my lips have kissed, for voice & piano. Text: Edna St. Vincent Millay. Première: Washington, Corcoran Galley; Mary Beck; 1956/II/7.

When the dove enters in, for voice & piano (c1960). Text: Langston Hughes.

----- for SATB (1962).

Wings over Broadway, ballet (ca. 1940), Première: New York, Hurricane Restaurant.

Winter night’s dream, operetta for children (1935). Text: Robert Dunsmore. Première: Chicago. See also Children’s sleep.

You can tell the world, for SSA. New York: Mutual Music. 1964.

----- for SATB.

----- for SSA. New York: Mutual Music, 1946, 1964 (121). 8p.

----- for TTBB. New York: Mutual Music, 1946, 1964 (122). 8p.

----- for soprano & piano.

CD: Sebronette Barnes, soprano; Elise Auerbach, piano. Senrab Records (2001; You can tell the world; songs by African-American women).

LP: Veronica Tyler, soprano; Ernest Ragogini, piano. BRC Productions (1980; The passion of Christ in spirituals).

LP: Wilhelmenia Fernandez, soprano; George Darden piano. Tioch Digital Records TD 1009 (1982; spirituals).

----- for TTBB. New York: Mutual Music, 1957.

You’re pretty special, for voice & piano (c1941). Text: Dorothy Sachs.

24 Bibliography
Prof. Dominique-René de Lerma
[obituary] in Black perspective in music, v1 (1973) p197.

[obituary] in Variety, n266 (1972/V/10) p86.

“Famed Chicago composer’s rites set for Tuesday” in Chicago defender (1972/V/2).

“Margaret Bonds” in Musical America (1952/II) p218.

“Margaret Bonds, composer dies, noted arranger of spirituals” in New York Amsterdam news (1972/V/13).

“Mrs. Bonds, musician, dies in New York City” in Chicago defender (1957/III/2 [sic?]).[15]

“Margaret Bonds, pianist, Town Hall, Feb. 7 debut” in Musical America (1952/II) p218.

“Noted tenor and Miss Margaret Bonds star with symphony” in Chicago defender (1933/0VI/17).

”Premières highlight SAI national convention” in Panpipes, v52n2 (1960) p26. [The pasture]

Abdul-Rahim, Raoul. "Black women in music" in Blacks in classical music. New York: Dodd, Mead, 1977, p51-57.

American music v3n1, p108, 111; 4n2, p196 (Bond)

Ammer, Christine. Unsung; A history of women in American music. Westport: Greenwood Press, 1980, p153-156.

ASCAP

Atkinson, Brooks. “Theater; Shakespeare in Harlem” in New York times (1960/II/10).

Bernheimer, Martin. “Zubin Mehta leads tribute” in Los Angeles times (1960/II/10). [Credo].

Berry, Faith. Langston Hughes; before and beyond Harlem. Westport: Lawrence Hill, 1983.

Berry, Lemuel, Jr.

Black music research bulletin v12n2, p11, 14, 16, 19

Black music research journal, 1980, p82, 90; 1981-1982, p12

Black perspective in music, v1n2, p197; v2n2, p148; v5n1, p37; v5n2, p239; v6n2, p238 (Bond); v9n1, p96; v10n1, p115; v11n2, p233, 236; v14n1, p77, 79.

Bonds, Margaret. “A reminiscence” in The Negro in music and art, ed. by Lindsay Patterson. New York: Publishing Co., 1968, p190-193.

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Bonds, Margaret. “A reminiscence” in The Negro in music and art, ed. by Lindsay Patterson. New York: International Library of Negro Life and History, 1968, p190-193.

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Claghorn 1984 (-1971)

Cohen, Aaron. International encyclopedia of women composers. 2nd ed. New York: R. R. Bowker, 1987.

Demaitre, Christina. “She has a musical mission, developing racial harmpony; Heritage motivates composing career” in Washington post (1964/IVIII

Dillon, Alice. The orchestral arrangements of spirituals by Margaret Bonds. Graduate paper (D.M.A) University of Missouri, Kansas City, 1998.

Fisk 1980, p83

Floyd, Rosalyn Wright. Afro-American piano music; two Black American female composers. Graduate paper (D.M.A.) University of South Carolina, 1990.

Floyd, Samuel A., Jr. Black music biography; an annotated bibliography, by Samuel A. Floyd, Jr., and Marsha Reisser. White Plains: Kraus International Publications, 1986., pxviii, 218

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Green, Mildred Denby. A study of the lives and works of five Black women composers in America. Graduate paper (D.M.E., music education) University of Oklahoma, 1975. vii, 331 p. Research director: E. Trumble. DDM Code: 71woGreM; DA no.: 37/01:24-5; RILM no.: UM no.: 76-15,803.

Green, Mildred Denby. Black women composers; A genesis. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1983. 171p. (Twayne's music series). ISBN 0-8057-9450-6.

Harris, Carl Gordon, Jr. “Three schools of Black choral composers and arrangers, 1900-1970” in School music news, v34n4 (1974/VII) p33-39.

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Harris, Carl Gordon, Jr. A study of characteristic stylistic trends found in the choral works of a selected group of Afro-American composers and arrangers. Graduate paper ( D.M.A., performance) University of Missouri-Kansas City, 1972. viii, 178 p. facs., mus. exs., append. DDM Code: 71voHarC; DA no.: 33/07:3696; RILM no.: UM no.: 72-29,463.

Harris, Charlene Diane. Margaret Bonds, Black woman composer. Theiss (M.M.) Bowling Green State University, 1976.

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Horne, Aaron. String music by Black American composers. Westport: Greenwood Press, 1991 (Music reference collection, no. 33). xx, 327p. Foreword by Dominique-René de Lerma. ISBN 0-313-27938-1. +

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Patterson 1988, p196

Roach, Hildred. Black American music, past and present. Boston: Crescendo, 1973. (Bond)

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This page was last updated on March 03, 2014